What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids, Be Web Clever

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids, Be Web Smart

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids?

January 28, two thousand fourteen modified January 28, two thousand fourteen 22 Comments

It takes two to Tango, but with the Tango app you can tango with up to fifty people at once. Tango is a messaging app, similar to popular apps like Kik and WhatsApp. Tango seems to have about a billion features, and describes itself as the “all-in-one” social networking app.

With Tango you can make movie calls, text talk, share pictures and movies, play games, and send music to friends. With over one hundred sixty million registered users, it’s fairly possible your teenage may have heard of or is using Tango.

Why teenagers may be using Tango

Tango is multi-platform, meaning it can be used with friends who use different types of devices. For example if all your friends have an Apple device, you can use Apple’s iMessage and FaceTime to communicate with each other. But what if a friend has an Android phone or Windows phone, or no device? iMessage won’t work. Tango is available for iOS devices, Android phones and tablets, and Windows phones and PC’s and. This gives the capability to communicate by voice, text and movie regardless of your operating system. Tango also provides the capability for group talks and calls, a social feature teenagers are likely to love.

Games and music and more

After using Tango for a bit I could see the appeal. During a movie talk you can send adorable animations, you can play games while talking, and can share music using Spotify right within the app. There are filters you can add to enhance the photos you send, and filters to add cool effects during a movie talk. While adults might just want a quick way to communicate via text, teenagers and youthfull adults would likely spend more time suspending out with each over the app using the joy add-ins.

Sharing songs via Tango – any song title might come up here as you can see!

Privacy concerns and other considerations

Profile Privacy and Location

By default, your Tango profile is public. There is a “find friends nearby” feature that uses location services to find other Tango users near you. You can set your profile to Private and you can turn off location services for the Tango app if you would choose not to use these features. Parents, if your kids are using Tango you may want to ensure these settings are in place. This would prevent random people from finding them on Tango.

Annoyingly, with Location Services turned off, I often eyed a prompt to turn the service back on. I’m not sure how many times you’ve got to click “Got it!” to stop observing this reminder! My thought is that teenagers that see this every time they use the app are going to feel like they are missing out. While you can lock location settings in place using confinements the constant reminder may not go over well.

Also, even with location services turned off, there is a search box where you can switch your location. So indeed all you have to do is tell Tango where you are – or mark any location on a map – and the app will search for users near that area. This makes disabling location services kind of worthless – you can by hand set your location instead of having your device tell the app where you are.

The Popular People of Tango

There is a page called “Popular People” which gives you access to some user’s profiles. This looks to be mostly youthfull dudes and women, and includes a filter if you only want to see fellows or only want to see women (which makes it seem like a “let’s hook up” sort of app). This is an “anything goes” kind of area – nothing to stop teenagers from clicking through the profiles – since they are public – to view the many selfies posted by Tango users. Most were tame, but I did see a bit of nakedness and a nice youthful gentleman with his middle finger in the air.

As with other social networking sites and apps, certain information in your profile is always public, such as your name or username and profile picture. This is true with Tango, so you might urge your teenage to make sure they are not sharing individual information here. There is a spot to include bday (month and date) and gender but you can leave those blank. I did realize that once you add that information, there is no way to liquidate it (which is kind of annoying).

In-App Purchases

The Tango service is free, but there are extra options you can add as in-app purchases. For example during a call you can send animations to friends – notice you can buy them for $1.99. There is a feature (mentioned in the iTunes store but not on their website – at least that I could find) called “Tango Premium Discovery – Talk with the most popular people on Tango” for $9.99 per month. There isn’t much detail about what this means exactly, but I suspect it gives you the capability to talk with the users who demonstrate up on that “Popular People” page. (If anyone knows – leave a comment!) If you are worried about in-app purchases, you can always disable them in Limitations.

Like most other apps and social sites, Tango is not intended for those under thirteen, which is mentioned in their privacy policy and terms of service. (Albeit remarkably the app is rated Four+ in the Apple app store). As always you’ll want to discuss with your kids that with any app or website:

  1. Only “friend” people you know
  2. Don’t accept calls/texts unless you recognize the name or number
  3. Don’t give out your name/number publicly such as on another social media profile
  4. And always let you know if they encounter anything or anyone scary or disturbing.

Tango does have a “block user” feature if it comes to that. With these safeguards in mind, Tango could be used just as securely as built-in messaging such as iMessage. I would most likely recommend for older teenagers only due to the “Popular people” section that might display content deemed inappropriate for junior eyes.

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids, Be Web Brainy

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids?

January 28, two thousand fourteen modified January 28, two thousand fourteen 22 Comments

It takes two to Tango, but with the Tango app you can tango with up to fifty people at once. Tango is a messaging app, similar to popular apps like Kik and WhatsApp. Tango seems to have about a billion features, and describes itself as the “all-in-one” social networking app.

With Tango you can make movie calls, text talk, share pictures and movies, play games, and send music to friends. With over one hundred sixty million registered users, it’s fairly possible your teenage may have heard of or is using Tango.

Why teenagers may be using Tango

Tango is multi-platform, meaning it can be used with friends who use different types of devices. For example if all your friends have an Apple device, you can use Apple’s iMessage and FaceTime to communicate with each other. But what if a friend has an Android phone or Windows phone, or no device? iMessage won’t work. Tango is available for iOS devices, Android phones and tablets, and Windows phones and PC’s and. This gives the capability to communicate by voice, text and movie regardless of your operating system. Tango also provides the capability for group talks and calls, a social feature teenagers are likely to love.

Games and music and more

After using Tango for a bit I could see the appeal. During a movie talk you can send lovely animations, you can play games while talking, and can share music using Spotify right within the app. There are filters you can add to enhance the photos you send, and filters to add cool effects during a movie talk. While adults might just want a quick way to communicate via text, teenagers and youthfull adults would likely spend more time stringing up out with each over the app using the joy add-ins.

Sharing songs via Tango – any song title might come up here as you can see!

Privacy concerns and other considerations

Profile Privacy and Location

By default, your Tango profile is public. There is a “find friends nearby” feature that uses location services to find other Tango users near you. You can set your profile to Private and you can turn off location services for the Tango app if you would choose not to use these features. Parents, if your kids are using Tango you may want to ensure these settings are in place. This would prevent random people from finding them on Tango.

Annoyingly, with Location Services turned off, I often eyed a prompt to turn the service back on. I’m not sure how many times you’ve got to click “Got it!” to stop eyeing this reminder! My thought is that teenagers that see this every time they use the app are going to feel like they are missing out. While you can lock location settings in place using confinements the constant reminder may not go over well.

Also, even with location services turned off, there is a search box where you can switch your location. So truly all you have to do is tell Tango where you are – or mark any location on a map – and the app will search for users near that area. This makes disabling location services kind of futile – you can by hand set your location instead of having your device tell the app where you are.

The Popular People of Tango

There is a page called “Popular People” which gives you access to some user’s profiles. This looks to be mostly youthfull dudes and women, and includes a filter if you only want to see fellows or only want to see women (which makes it seem like a “let’s hook up” sort of app). This is an “anything goes” kind of area – nothing to stop teenagers from clicking through the profiles – since they are public – to view the many selfies posted by Tango users. Most were tame, but I did see a bit of nakedness and a nice youthfull gentleman with his middle finger in the air.

As with other social networking sites and apps, certain information in your profile is always public, such as your name or username and profile picture. This is true with Tango, so you might urge your teenage to make sure they are not sharing individual information here. There is a spot to include bday (month and date) and gender but you can leave those blank. I did realize that once you add that information, there is no way to eliminate it (which is kind of annoying).

In-App Purchases

The Tango service is free, but there are extra options you can add as in-app purchases. For example during a call you can send animations to friends – notice you can buy them for $1.99. There is a feature (mentioned in the iTunes store but not on their website – at least that I could find) called “Tango Premium Discovery – Talk with the most popular people on Tango” for $9.99 per month. There isn’t much detail about what this means exactly, but I suspect it gives you the capability to talk with the users who demonstrate up on that “Popular People” page. (If anyone knows – leave a comment!) If you are worried about in-app purchases, you can always disable them in Limitations.

Like most other apps and social sites, Tango is not intended for those under thirteen, which is mentioned in their privacy policy and terms of service. (Albeit remarkably the app is rated Four+ in the Apple app store). As always you’ll want to discuss with your kids that with any app or website:

  1. Only “friend” people you know
  2. Don’t accept calls/texts unless you recognize the name or number
  3. Don’t give out your name/number publicly such as on another social media profile
  4. And always let you know if they encounter anything or anyone scary or disturbing.

Tango does have a “block user” feature if it comes to that. With these safeguards in mind, Tango could be used just as securely as built-in messaging such as iMessage. I would most likely recommend for older teenagers only due to the “Popular people” section that might display content deemed inappropriate for junior eyes.

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids, Be Web Clever

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids?

January 28, two thousand fourteen modified January 28, two thousand fourteen 22 Comments

It takes two to Tango, but with the Tango app you can tango with up to fifty people at once. Tango is a messaging app, similar to popular apps like Kik and WhatsApp. Tango seems to have about a billion features, and describes itself as the “all-in-one” social networking app.

With Tango you can make movie calls, text talk, share pictures and movies, play games, and send music to friends. With over one hundred sixty million registered users, it’s fairly possible your teenage may have heard of or is using Tango.

Why teenagers may be using Tango

Tango is multi-platform, meaning it can be used with friends who use different types of devices. For example if all your friends have an Apple device, you can use Apple’s iMessage and FaceTime to communicate with each other. But what if a friend has an Android phone or Windows phone, or no device? iMessage won’t work. Tango is available for iOS devices, Android phones and tablets, and Windows phones and PC’s and. This gives the capability to communicate by voice, text and movie regardless of your operating system. Tango also provides the capability for group talks and calls, a social feature teenagers are likely to love.

Games and music and more

After using Tango for a bit I could see the appeal. During a movie talk you can send nice animations, you can play games while talking, and can share music using Spotify right within the app. There are filters you can add to enhance the photos you send, and filters to add cool effects during a movie talk. While adults might just want a quick way to communicate via text, teenagers and youthfull adults would likely spend more time dangling out with each over the app using the joy add-ins.

Sharing songs via Tango – any song title might come up here as you can see!

Privacy concerns and other considerations

Profile Privacy and Location

By default, your Tango profile is public. There is a “find friends nearby” feature that uses location services to find other Tango users near you. You can set your profile to Private and you can turn off location services for the Tango app if you would choose not to use these features. Parents, if your kids are using Tango you may want to ensure these settings are in place. This would prevent random people from finding them on Tango.

Annoyingly, with Location Services turned off, I often witnessed a prompt to turn the service back on. I’m not sure how many times you’ve got to click “Got it!” to stop observing this reminder! My thought is that teenagers that see this every time they use the app are going to feel like they are missing out. While you can lock location settings in place using confinements the constant reminder may not go over well.

Also, even with location services turned off, there is a search box where you can switch your location. So indeed all you have to do is tell Tango where you are – or mark any location on a map – and the app will search for users near that area. This makes disabling location services kind of futile – you can by hand set your location instead of having your device tell the app where you are.

The Popular People of Tango

There is a page called “Popular People” which gives you access to some user’s profiles. This looks to be mostly youthfull guys and women, and includes a filter if you only want to see boys or only want to see women (which makes it seem like a “let’s hook up” sort of app). This is an “anything goes” kind of area – nothing to stop teenagers from clicking through the profiles – since they are public – to view the many selfies posted by Tango users. Most were tame, but I did see a bit of nakedness and a nice youthfull gentleman with his middle finger in the air.

As with other social networking sites and apps, certain information in your profile is always public, such as your name or username and profile picture. This is true with Tango, so you might urge your teenage to make sure they are not sharing individual information here. There is a spot to include bday (month and date) and gender but you can leave those blank. I did realize that once you add that information, there is no way to eliminate it (which is kind of annoying).

In-App Purchases

The Tango service is free, but there are extra options you can add as in-app purchases. For example during a call you can send animations to friends – notice you can buy them for $1.99. There is a feature (mentioned in the iTunes store but not on their website – at least that I could find) called “Tango Premium Discovery – Talk with the most popular people on Tango” for $9.99 per month. There isn’t much detail about what this means exactly, but I suspect it gives you the capability to talk with the users who demonstrate up on that “Popular People” page. (If anyone knows – leave a comment!) If you are worried about in-app purchases, you can always disable them in Confinements.

Like most other apps and social sites, Tango is not intended for those under thirteen, which is mentioned in their privacy policy and terms of service. (Albeit remarkably the app is rated Four+ in the Apple app store). As always you’ll want to discuss with your kids that with any app or website:

  1. Only “friend” people you know
  2. Don’t accept calls/texts unless you recognize the name or number
  3. Don’t give out your name/number publicly such as on another social media profile
  4. And always let you know if they encounter anything or anyone scary or disturbing.

Tango does have a “block user” feature if it comes to that. With these safeguards in mind, Tango could be used just as securely as built-in messaging such as iMessage. I would most likely recommend for older teenagers only due to the “Popular people” section that might display content deemed inappropriate for junior eyes.

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids, Be Web Brainy

What is Tango? Is Tango okay for Kids?

January 28, two thousand fourteen modified January 28, two thousand fourteen 22 Comments

It takes two to Tango, but with the Tango app you can tango with up to fifty people at once. Tango is a messaging app, similar to popular apps like Kik and WhatsApp. Tango seems to have about a billion features, and describes itself as the “all-in-one” social networking app.

With Tango you can make movie calls, text talk, share pictures and movies, play games, and send music to friends. With over one hundred sixty million registered users, it’s fairly possible your teenage may have heard of or is using Tango.

Why teenagers may be using Tango

Tango is multi-platform, meaning it can be used with friends who use different types of devices. For example if all your friends have an Apple device, you can use Apple’s iMessage and FaceTime to communicate with each other. But what if a friend has an Android phone or Windows phone, or no device? iMessage won’t work. Tango is available for iOS devices, Android phones and tablets, and Windows phones and PC’s and. This gives the capability to communicate by voice, text and movie regardless of your operating system. Tango also provides the capability for group talks and calls, a social feature teenagers are likely to love.

Games and music and more

After using Tango for a bit I could see the appeal. During a movie talk you can send adorable animations, you can play games while talking, and can share music using Spotify right within the app. There are filters you can add to enhance the photos you send, and filters to add cool effects during a movie talk. While adults might just want a quick way to communicate via text, teenagers and youthful adults would likely spend more time draping out with each over the app using the joy add-ins.

Sharing songs via Tango – any song title might come up here as you can see!

Privacy concerns and other considerations

Profile Privacy and Location

By default, your Tango profile is public. There is a “find friends nearby” feature that uses location services to find other Tango users near you. You can set your profile to Private and you can turn off location services for the Tango app if you would choose not to use these features. Parents, if your kids are using Tango you may want to ensure these settings are in place. This would prevent random people from finding them on Tango.

Annoyingly, with Location Services turned off, I often eyed a prompt to turn the service back on. I’m not sure how many times you’ve got to click “Got it!” to stop eyeing this reminder! My thought is that teenagers that see this every time they use the app are going to feel like they are missing out. While you can lock location settings in place using confinements the constant reminder may not go over well.

Also, even with location services turned off, there is a search box where you can switch your location. So indeed all you have to do is tell Tango where you are – or mark any location on a map – and the app will search for users near that area. This makes disabling location services kind of worthless – you can by hand set your location instead of having your device tell the app where you are.

The Popular People of Tango

There is a page called “Popular People” which gives you access to some user’s profiles. This looks to be mostly youthfull studs and women, and includes a filter if you only want to see fellows or only want to see women (which makes it seem like a “let’s hook up” sort of app). This is an “anything goes” kind of area – nothing to stop teenagers from clicking through the profiles – since they are public – to view the many selfies posted by Tango users. Most were tame, but I did see a bit of nakedness and a nice youthful gentleman with his middle finger in the air.

As with other social networking sites and apps, certain information in your profile is always public, such as your name or username and profile picture. This is true with Tango, so you might urge your teenage to make sure they are not sharing individual information here. There is a spot to include bday (month and date) and gender but you can leave those blank. I did realize that once you add that information, there is no way to eliminate it (which is kind of annoying).

In-App Purchases

The Tango service is free, but there are extra options you can add as in-app purchases. For example during a call you can send animations to friends – notice you can buy them for $1.99. There is a feature (mentioned in the iTunes store but not on their website – at least that I could find) called “Tango Premium Discovery – Talk with the most popular people on Tango” for $9.99 per month. There isn’t much detail about what this means exactly, but I suspect it gives you the capability to talk with the users who showcase up on that “Popular People” page. (If anyone knows – leave a comment!) If you are worried about in-app purchases, you can always disable them in Confinements.

Like most other apps and social sites, Tango is not intended for those under thirteen, which is mentioned in their privacy policy and terms of service. (Albeit remarkably the app is rated Four+ in the Apple app store). As always you’ll want to discuss with your kids that with any app or website:

  1. Only “friend” people you know
  2. Don’t accept calls/texts unless you recognize the name or number
  3. Don’t give out your name/number publicly such as on another social media profile
  4. And always let you know if they encounter anything or anyone scary or disturbing.

Tango does have a “block user” feature if it comes to that. With these safeguards in mind, Tango could be used just as securely as built-in messaging such as iMessage. I would very likely recommend for older teenagers only due to the “Popular people” section that might display content deemed inappropriate for junior eyes.

Related video:

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *